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Caves of the Elephants

Elephanta Caves are a World Heritage Site and a collection of cave temples dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva, with a lot of Shivalings.

They are located on Elephanta Island, or Gharapuri (literally "the city of caves"). It is about a 1 hr boat ride from The Gateway of India.

Living in Mumbai for more than 30+ years i had never visited them and so was the case with my girl friends !!
So we three decided to go and visit it, like a check mark to our list of things to do in Mumbai :P





There are a lot of local hawkers selling variety of things on the way to the caves, which is about 120 steps up hill.
The caves are mostly damaged, but still recently a lot of restoration is done and there are guards kept to ensure people do not misuse things. There are a lot of people trying to be guides, however it is better to read up rather than spending money on the guides.


The three faced statue (Trimurti) is the most beautiful and considered a masterpiece. Shiva the Hindu God has always been a fascin…
Recent posts

ENTEROCOCCUS: Do Not ENTER!!

Recently it was my fathers bday and my sister wrote a wonderful writeup. It brought up a lot of horrid memories of the past year, but its mainly to educate others of the deadly virus 
"ENTEROCOCCUS"

In this post, i am just promoting my sisters post Happy Bday Dad!! :P
I urge each one of you to read that !!
Once again wishing dad a Happy 65



Thanks to Nitin / Yatin

A small incident ... which i liked a lot...

I went to the bus stop to catch the bus...and there was a old lady standing there..
Seeing me she wished me Good Morning..:)
The she asked me if I worked for BT...and I said yes..

Then she told me, that you know yest i spoke to someone from BT for my connection... and we spoke for an hour yet the issue was not resolved, however the person whom i spoke with was very polite and patient

The first thing she told him was tht she knew nothing about the computer and she was a bit deaf, and hearing this the fellow told her not a problem he will help her.. and he tried for an hour and yet he couldnt resolve the issue...
he had her pc on remote and there she saw her name as Nitin/Yatin K...

She told me she really wanted to thank him for being so patient and polite with her.. she really liked it..
she told me she was a teacher and she first used to teach at the university for some years... now she teaches to girls of the military ppl..
she always belives tht if…

Hilarious Parsi Surnames

WHAT DO YOU CALL A PARSEE....?

Bootlegger? ..... Daruwalla

Who is dumb? .... Mooga

Those who believe they are Civil Servants? .... Sarkari

Who sells branded booze? .... Jinwalla

Who is into Astrology? .... Tara Chand
\
The best person to repair machines? ... ENGINEER.

Who tinkers with a short fuse? .... Tester

Who doesn't like rice? .... Naanwalla

Those don't like being called Parsis? ... Malloo

Who think they are cattle owners? ... Bhes sania

A Patriotic Indian Parsi? .... Gandhi

Why read the Khordeh Avesta when we cannot understand it????

A common question from our youngsters today.......

Why do we read the Khordeh Avesta even though we don't understand anything?This is beautiful story - if inspired please forward, else keep it .......can'tsay when it might inspire you! An old Priest lived on a farm in the mountains with his young grandson.Each morning Grandpa was up early sitting at the kitchen table readinghis Khordeh Avesta. His grandson wanted to be just like him and tried to imitate him in every way he could.One day the grandson asked, 'Grandpa! I try to read the Khordeh Avesta just like you but I don't understand it, and what I do understand I forget assoon as I close the book. What good does reading the Khordeh Avesta do?' The Grandfather quietly turned from putting coal in the stove and replied, 'Take this coal basket down to the river and bring me back abasket of water.'The boy did as he was told, but all the water leaked out before he got back to the house. The grandfather laughed a…

LONG LIVE THE PARSIS !

LONG LIVE THE PARSIS !

'Dying ? Who's dying ?' he asked, outraged. 'I'm not. And I have extensions of myself - two sons and one daughter. So have you. Dying ? What are you talking about ?'
But Fali, we are dying', I tried to explain. 'Read this article :'The death rates are higher than birth rates. What can you say to that ?'
Fali belongs to the old, 'never-say-die' brigade. There was no way I could convince him about the gravity of the situation.
'The whole world worries about us; most of our customs and rituals are being documented for preservation.' I pressed on.
'What preservation ? Fali growled. 'I am here, jivto jagto ! Are you scared, or what, by what these idiots are saying ? Heh, heh, heh', he chortled. 'Nothing can wipe us out !' Fali put the thing in perfect perspective.
'I don't believe these rubbishy statistics. If the Lord intended to die out, our little boat would have been gulped down by the …

Life's Little Instruction Book

Life's Little Instruction Book :-)

Have a firm handshake.
Look people in the eye.
Sing in the shower.
Own a great stereo system.
If in a fight, hit first and hit hard.
Keep secrets.
Never give up on anybody.
Miracles happen everyday.
Always accept an outstretched hand.
Be brave.
Even if you're not, pretend to be.
No one can tell the difference.
Whistle.
Avoid sarcastic remarks.
Choose your life's mate carefully.
From this one decision will come 90 per cent of all your happiness or misery.
Make it a habit to do nice things for people who will never find out.
Lend only those books you never care to see again.
Never deprive someone of hope; it might be all that they have.
When playing games with children, let them win.
Give people a second chance, but not a third.
Be romantic.
Become the most positive and enthusiastic person you know.
Loosen up.
Relax.
Except for rare life-and-death matters, nothing is as important as it first seems.
Don't allow the phone to interrupt important moments. It's th…

Some Pics Of Navjote

Father and Son




The Navjote Family



The Family



My Nani(Mamaiji)





My Uncle(Kaka) And Aunty(Mausi)




Me in this pic................



My Family



To the wonderful kids who were born in India and survived the 60's,70's & 80’s.

First, we survived being born to mothers, some, whose husbands smoked and /or drank while they carried us. They took aspirin, ate whatever food was put on the table, and didn't get tested for diabetes. They were mothers who did not check their blood pressure every few minutes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cribs and bassinets were covered with bright colored lead-based paints. We were put in prams and sent out with ayahs to meet other children with ayahs, whilst our parents were busy. We cried, were picked up and cuddled by the ayahs and were quiet again.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets, and when we rode our bikes we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking or going out on our own. As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or airbags.
We sat on each other's laps for God's sake. Riding in the back of a station wagon on a warm day was always a special treat. We drank water from the garden hose and NOT from a …

Can I?

Today, I finally decided to wait for her outside the office. I’ve been preparing myself for this scene for ages but never could bring myself to say it all cut and dry at her face. But, TODAY was THE DAY. When she came near me, I asked her to get on the bike with me. As usual she tried her best not to. She was always afraid of bikes. I knew that. Still I wanted her to give her a ride – that was the first thing in the plan I had for today. At last, I won the war of words and she got beside me. I could feel her tension whenever a turn or a speedbreaker came. I couldn’t stop myself from smiling when she clutched my shoulder whenever I overtook another vehicle. The next surprise for her was when we reached our destination.



It was my favorite trekking place, not very far from town. As I expected, she didn’t want to climb down the small hill with me to the place I wanted to take her. Again, she had to agree. She was holding my hand too tight and was also shivering when I lead the way downhill…

RUSTAM-FARAMNA of AGIYARI at PARSI COLONY

RUSTAM-FARAMNA of AGIYARI at PARSI COLONY, DADAR, B'bay.

Rustam, was a poor youth, who had lost his father, when he was very

young, and was staying with his ailing mother, in Pandey Chawl, at

Karelwadi, Thakurwad, Mumbai. Due to poverty he was not properly

educated. He was dark skinned, thin and very tall, and had a very

shrill voice. Finding employment was a problem for him, due to all

his drawbacks.



Ultimately, he approached one Dadi,Thoothi, who had formed a

drama company to stage dramas, to employ him as an actor.

During that period, cinemas showing silent films had not yet entered

Mumbai, hence, staged dramas were the attractions for entertainment.

During those days, female roles on stage were performed by male

actors. Due to his shrill voice, he was suitable for female roles, but

his tall stature was a handicap. Nevertheless, as his luck would have

it, this handicap turned out to be an asset for the drama company,

because the audience automatically started laughing and clapping

the…