Sunday, November 07, 2010

Thanks to Nitin / Yatin

A small incident ... which i liked a lot...

I went to the bus stop to catch the bus...and there was a old lady standing there..
Seeing me she wished me Good Morning..:)
The she asked me if I worked for BT...and I said yes..

Then she told me, that you know yest i spoke to someone from BT for my connection... and we spoke for an hour yet the issue was not resolved, however the person whom i spoke with was very polite and patient

The first thing she told him was tht she knew nothing about the computer and she was a bit deaf, and hearing this the fellow told her not a problem he will help her.. and he tried for an hour and yet he couldnt resolve the issue...
he had her pc on remote and there she saw her name as Nitin/Yatin K...

She told me she really wanted to thank him for being so patient and polite with her.. she really liked it..
she told me she was a teacher and she first used to teach at the university for some years... now she teaches to girls of the military ppl..
she always belives tht if someone /something is nt working she will complain...and if she likes something na .. she will also ensure that it is noticed...
And she wants to thank the person who helped her..

So i thought of mentioning it here and thank that person...so thanks to Nitin/Yatin whoever it was...

Saturday, June 21, 2008

Hilarious Parsi Surnames

WHAT DO YOU CALL A PARSEE....?

Bootlegger? ..... Daruwalla

Who is dumb? .... Mooga

Those who believe they are Civil Servants? .... Sarkari

Who sells branded booze? .... Jinwalla

Who is into Astrology? .... Tara Chand
\
The best person to repair machines? ... ENGINEER.

Who tinkers with a short fuse? .... Tester

Who doesn't like rice? .... Naanwalla

Those don't like being called Parsis? ... Malloo

Who think they are cattle owners? ... Bhes sania

A Patriotic Indian Parsi? .... Gandhi

One who likes to scare kids' everyday? .... De boo (The Boo)

Who is brave? .... Bahadur

A religious Parsi? ... Dastur

Who believe they are the custodians of Agiyaris? .... Kathiwalla

Those that want to be Grocers? .... Kaandawalla

A watch repairer? .... Ghadialy

Who has a chance at the Guinness Book of World Records? ....
SodaWaterBottleOpenerwalla.

Who Lives in a castle? .... Killawala

A parsi chauffeur? .... Driver

Who has aspirations of flying/sailing? .... Captain

A corrupt politician? .... Kaalaa Gandhi

Grave Digger? .... Ghorkhodu

Who doesn't give a damn about anything? .... Goli Mar

A Parsi labourer? .... Contractor

Who love dry fruits? .... Mevawalla

Who always likes to wave Bye-Bye? .... Ta-ta

Who thinks he is aristocratic? .... Noble

The teachers of the community? .... Master >

Who thinks bananas to be a source of potassium? .... Kerawalla


Who loves to cook? .... Masalawalla

Who is a Wheeler Dealer? .... Dalal

Those who think they have a military background..... Marshall

Who loves plenty of cats? .... Billi Moria

Who agrees with everybody? .... Jee Jee Bhoy

What do you call a nalli daru ni batli? .... Nalladaru >

Who is eccentric? .... Mad on


Who has gas problems? .... Ka Padia

Who runs around in sheep's clothing? .... Un Walla

A Small Parsi businessman? .... Nallaseth

A Parsi slumlord? .... Bhiwandi Walla

Who loves having a Sweet tooth? .... Gol Walla

Who is a fireman? .... Bambawalla

A skinny Parsi? .... Dandiwalla

Who thinks the cafeteria is his second home? .... Canteenwalla

A Parsi lawyer? .... Vakil

One who's imported from Italy? .... Italia

Who goes around pressing everything? .... Daboo

Who can reproduce at will? .... Ichha-poria

A Parsi Shikari? .... Wagmaroo

African Parsi? .... Zanzibarwala

Saturday, April 26, 2008

Why read the Khordeh Avesta when we cannot understand it????

A common question from our youngsters today.......

Why do we read the Khordeh Avesta even though we don't understand anything?This is beautiful story - if inspired please forward, else keep it .......can'tsay when it might inspire you! An old Priest lived on a farm in the mountains with his young grandson.Each morning Grandpa was up early sitting at the kitchen table readinghis Khordeh Avesta. His grandson wanted to be just like him and tried to imitate him in every way he could.One day the grandson asked, 'Grandpa! I try to read the Khordeh Avesta just like you but I don't understand it, and what I do understand I forget assoon as I close the book. What good does reading the Khordeh Avesta do?' The Grandfather quietly turned from putting coal in the stove and replied, 'Take this coal basket down to the river and bring me back abasket of water.'The boy did as he was told, but all the water leaked out before he got back to the house. The grandfather laughed and said, 'You'll have to move a little faster next time,' and sent him back to the river with thebasket to try again.This time the boy ran faster, but again the basket was empty before he returned home. Out of breath, he told his grandfather that it was impossible to carry water in a basket, and he went to get a bucketinstead. The old man said, 'I don't want a bucket of water; I want a basket of water. You're just not trying hard enough,' and he went out the door to watch the boy try again.At this point, the boy knew it was impossible, but he wanted to show hisgrandfather that even if he ran as fast as he could, the water would leak out before he got back to the house. The boy again dipped the basket into river and ran hard, but when hereached his grandfather the basket was again empty. Out of breath, hesaid, 'See Grandpa, it's useless!' 'So you think it is useless?' The old man said, 'Look at the basket.' The boy looked at the basket and for the first time realized thatthe basket was different. It had been transformed from a dirty old coal basket and was now clean, inside and out.'Son, that's what happens when you read the Khordeh Avesta. You might not understand or remember everything, but when you read it, you willbe changed, inside and out.
That is the work of Zarathushtra in our lives..'

Sunday, February 10, 2008

LONG LIVE THE PARSIS !

LONG LIVE THE PARSIS !

'Dying ? Who's dying ?' he asked, outraged. 'I'm not. And I have extensions of myself - two sons and one daughter. So have you. Dying ? What are you talking about ?'
But Fali, we are dying', I tried to explain. 'Read this article :'The death rates are higher than birth rates. What can you say to that ?'
Fali belongs to the old, 'never-say-die' brigade. There was no way I could convince him about the gravity of the situation.
'The whole world worries about us; most of our customs and rituals are being documented for preservation.' I pressed on.
'What preservation ? Fali growled. 'I am here, jivto jagto ! Are you scared, or what, by what these idiots are saying ? Heh, heh, heh', he chortled. 'Nothing can wipe us out !' Fali put the thing in perfect perspective.
'I don't believe these rubbishy statistics. If the Lord intended to die out, our little boat would have been gulped down by the ocean when we fled Iran. But he did not. We were just a HANDFUL that landed here on the sands of Sanjan and see how many we are today. More than a lakh all over the world.' (this is the most important I think we should work on this paragraph, how did we multiply when we were only a few)
'He wanted us to do something and look what we have produced : gems .......a JRD, a Palkhivala, a Fali Nariman, a Sam Manekshaw, a Pirojshaw Godrej, not to talk of the Udvadias, the Sunawalas, the Godiwallas and Zubin. We have brains and business acumen.'
'And 'Quality'. We don't produce children by the dozen, but what we leave behind is quality stuff. It is nature's law that good things are rare, like us. We have always been a minuscule community. Now if you want to sit and cry, cry ! But I don't think we are doomed. If they want to document us, let them ! We have yet much to do and much to give!'
I watched him, bedazzled, as he put on his bushcoat to leave and planted a Parsi kiss on cheek. I raised a hand in quiet salutation and felt proud of the blood that flowed through my veins. He was like a breath of fresh air in an overcrowded room. I sat transfixed for a while. His attitude was convincing and contagious.
Probably it is this attitude that has kept us going. Numbers don't count. It is all a matter of attitude !


WE R THE BEST, HIP HIP HURRAY TO ALL THE PARSEES ON MOTHER EARTH.

WITH LOVE AND REGARDS TO ONE AND ALL.

Tanaz

Life's Little Instruction Book

Life's Little Instruction Book :-)

Have a firm handshake.
Look people in the eye.
Sing in the shower.
Own a great stereo system.
If in a fight, hit first and hit hard.
Keep secrets.
Never give up on anybody.
Miracles happen everyday.
Always accept an outstretched hand.
Be brave.
Even if you're not, pretend to be.
No one can tell the difference.
Whistle.
Avoid sarcastic remarks.
Choose your life's mate carefully.
From this one decision will come 90 per cent of all your happiness or misery.
Make it a habit to do nice things for people who will never find out.
Lend only those books you never care to see again.
Never deprive someone of hope; it might be all that they have.
When playing games with children, let them win.
Give people a second chance, but not a third.
Be romantic.
Become the most positive and enthusiastic person you know.
Loosen up.
Relax.
Except for rare life-and-death matters, nothing is as important as it first seems.
Don't allow the phone to interrupt important moments. It's there for your convenience, not the caller's.
Be a good loser.
Be a good winner.
Think twice before burdening a friend with a secret.
When someone hugs you, let them be the first to let go.
Be modest.
A lot was accomplished before you were born.
Keep life simple.
Beware of the person who has nothing to lose.
Don't burn bridges.
You'll be surprised how many times you have to cross the same river.
Live your life so that your epitaph could read, No Regrets Be bold and courageous.
When you look back on life, you'll regret the things you didn't do more than the one's you did.
Never waste an opportunity to tell someone you love them.
Remember no one makes it alone.
Have a grateful heart and be quick to acknowledge those who helped you.
Take charge of your attitude.
Don't let someone else choose it for you.
Visit friends and relatives when they are in hospital; you need only stay a few minutes.
Begin each day with some of your favorite music.
Once in a while, take the scenic route.
Send a lot of Valentine cards. Sign them, 'Someone who thinks you're terrific.'
Answer the phone with enthusiasm and energy in your voice.
Keep a note pad and pencil on your bed-side table. Million-dollar ideas sometimes strike at 3 a.m.
Show respect for everyone who works for a living, regardless of how trivial their job.
Send your loved ones flowers.
Think of a reason later.
Make someone's day by paying the toll for the person in the car behind you.
Become someone's hero.
Marry only for love.
Count your blessings.
Compliment the meal when you're a guest in someone's home.
Wave at the children on a school bus.
Remember that 80 per cent of the success in any job is based on your ability to deal with people.
Don't expect life to be fair.

Saturday, January 26, 2008

Some Pics Of Navjote



Father and Son




The Navjote Family



The Family



My Nani(Mamaiji)





My Uncle(Kaka) And Aunty(Mausi)




Me in this pic................



My Family




To the wonderful kids who were born in India and survived the 60's,70's & 80’s.

First, we survived being born to mothers, some, whose husbands smoked and /or drank while they carried us. They took aspirin, ate whatever food was put on the table, and didn't get tested for diabetes. They were mothers who did not check their blood pressure every few minutes.

Then after that trauma, our baby cribs and bassinets were covered with bright colored lead-based paints. We were put in prams and sent out with ayahs to meet other children with ayahs, whilst our parents were busy. We cried, were picked up and cuddled by the ayahs and were quiet again.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets, and when we rode our bikes we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking or going out on our own. As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or airbags.
We sat on each other's laps for God's sake. Riding in the back of a station wagon on a warm day was always a special treat. We drank water from the garden hose and NOT from a bottle. We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this. We would share a dosa; dip a chapatti into someone else's plate of curry without batting an eyelid. We ate jam sandwiches or pickle on bread and butter, raw mangoes with salt that set our teeth on edge, and drank orange squash with sugar and water in it.

We ate at roadside stalls, drank water from tender coconuts, ate everything that was bad for us from mungfalees to Bhel Puri to bhajias and samosas, but we weren't overweight because WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING! There was never a child - not one single child -who was obese!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day during the holidays, we were never ever bored, and we were allowed freedom all day as long as we were back when the streetlights came on, or when our parents told us to do so. No one was able to reach us all day by mobile phone or phone. And we were O.K. We would spend hours making paper kites, building things out of scraps with old pram wheels or cycle rims, inventing our own games, playing traditional games called hide and seek, kick the can and rounders, ride old cycles and then ride down the hill, only to find out
we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We swam with an inflated tube which we got from somebody who was replacing their car tyres. We ran barefoot without thinking about it, if we got cut we used iodine on it which made us jump. We did not wash our hands ten times a day. And we were OK.


We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, no I-Pods, no internet or internet chat rooms, no TV, full stop.

We did not have parents who said things like "what would you like for breakfast, lunch or dinner". We ate what was put in front of us and best of all, there was never any leftovers. We polished the lot. WE HAD FRIENDS, great friends, whose parents we called Uncle and Aunty, and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees numerous times, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no compensation claims from these accidents. We ate fruit lying on the ground that we shook down from the tree above. And we never washed fruit. We had a bath using a bucket and mug and used Mysore Sandal soap. We did not know what conditioners meant.

We made up games with sticks and tennis balls. We rode cycles everywhere and someone sat on the carrier or across the bar to school or the pictures not cinema, or you walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just walked in and talked to them! Not everyone made it into the teams we wanted to. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!
The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

This generation of ours has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever! The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!

Please pass this on to others who have had the luck and good fortune to grow up as kids in India, before the lawyers and the government regulated our lives ostensibly for our own good that changed what was good into bad and what was bad into worse.

Those were the days my friend!

Can I?

Today, I finally decided to wait for her outside the office. I’ve been preparing myself for this scene for ages but never could bring myself to say it all cut and dry at her face. But, TODAY was THE DAY. When she came near me, I asked her to get on the bike with me. As usual she tried her best not to. She was always afraid of bikes. I knew that. Still I wanted her to give her a ride – that was the first thing in the plan I had for today. At last, I won the war of words and she got beside me. I could feel her tension whenever a turn or a speedbreaker came. I couldn’t stop myself from smiling when she clutched my shoulder whenever I overtook another vehicle. The next surprise for her was when we reached our destination.



It was my favorite trekking place, not very far from town. As I expected, she didn’t want to climb down the small hill with me to the place I wanted to take her. Again, she had to agree. She was holding my hand too tight and was also shivering when I lead the way downhill. She was almost in tears and was cursing me for my stupid joke when we came back near my bike again. I was damn sure that if she had the option, she’d have left me there and taken a rick back home. Now, as the time had come for the Grande Finale, I knelt down before and took her hands in mine to ask “Look Shreya, I did all this just to show you that I’ll never let your fears rule you when you are with me. I want to keep you far away from ‘em for the rest of your life. Can I?”

Saturday, December 29, 2007

RUSTAM-FARAMNA of AGIYARI at PARSI COLONY

RUSTAM-FARAMNA of AGIYARI at PARSI COLONY, DADAR, B'bay.

Rustam, was a poor youth, who had lost his father, when he was very

young, and was staying with his ailing mother, in Pandey Chawl, at

Karelwadi, Thakurwad, Mumbai. Due to poverty he was not properly

educated. He was dark skinned, thin and very tall, and had a very

shrill voice. Finding employment was a problem for him, due to all

his drawbacks.



Ultimately, he approached one Dadi,Thoothi, who had formed a

drama company to stage dramas, to employ him as an actor.

During that period, cinemas showing silent films had not yet entered

Mumbai, hence, staged dramas were the attractions for entertainment.

During those days, female roles on stage were performed by male

actors. Due to his shrill voice, he was suitable for female roles, but

his tall stature was a handicap. Nevertheless, as his luck would have

it, this handicap turned out to be an asset for the drama company,

because the audience automatically started laughing and clapping

the moment he entered the stage.



During those days, Parsis were performing dramas in Hindi and Urdu

besides Gujarati, hence their dramatic societies performed in other

parts of the country too. Native Rajas, Maharajas, Nawabs were their

main patrons. Once, the Maharaja of Jaipur, invited Dadi Thoothi's

drama company to perform in his palace at Jaipur.


Now it so happened that, Rustamfaramna, besides being an actor,

also served as a "Babarchi" to feed his co-actors. He was an expert at

preparing Parsi dishes like 'Dhan-shak", "Curry-chaval", "Khichri-patio".

Once, Rustamfaramna made bold enough to offer his dish to the

Maharaja and his Indian and Foreign guests who had gathered to watch

a drama of his company. All of them relished the Parsi dishes so much

that it turned turned Rustamfaramna's fortune.



When his drama company prepared to leave Jaipur, to take up some other

assignment, the Maharaja of Jaipur, ordered Rustamfaramna not to leave,

because he wanted to appoint him as a cook in his Royal Guest-House.

All the Indian and Foreign guests of the Maharaja relished the food of

the guest-house so much, that the Maharaja, started sending Rustam-

faramna to his royal guesthouse at Agra too, because most often, the

guests who visited Jaipur, never failed to visit Agra too, to see the Taj,
and other Mughal monuments at Agra and Fatehpur-sikri.

In the good old days,Rustamfaramna's co-actors used to tease him, by

calling him Rustam-Curry-chaval. Now with his changed fortune, he felt

proud of the title awarded to him by his old colleagues.

Gradually, the Maharaja of Jaipur, helped Rustam-faramna, in financing

opening of his independent Hotel Savoy at Agra., which catered to the

rich in European style, with his favorite Parsee dishes. Then onwards,

he moved from rags to riches. He gathered wealth, but unfortunately

had no heir to hand it over.



Thus, the Dadar Parsee Colony, became fortunate enough to have

Its present Rustam-Faramna Agiyari, in 1930.

Saturday, October 27, 2007

Life At Tech M.................

hello to one and all

I m writing after a long time since I was in training
I didn't get ne time...but now after training I got no job to do
so thought shall rite some things.................abt my new job n how it all happ.

well to begin with I was too dam confused what to do
should I go for MCA or do this job
had seriously left it all to God............not told neone
had decided whatever comes first I shall take that up.
And ......so here I come to pune for the job

when I got the offer letter from coll it was written Mumbai and dam we were so happy
later we tried calling that swapnil shukla so many times and he was such a **** person
didn't know what to ans
so later the contact person mentioned we went to see her in the chandivali office
and God we get a shock of our lives there

she tells us to report to pune on 29th June 2007.

and in this all confusion I came to pune to inquire wt to do
since we didn't have ne idea
I met ms. Jodhwani(who took our interview) here
she was cool told me all abt here and the problems going on here
and later confirmed that we need to join at pune n not Mumbai
so on the 27th I land at pune

go around and see the place I need to go
it was a good place Sharda Centre-The corporate Office of Tech M

so on the 29th we all meet outside the office many have come
many are sardars also(hehe)
we were made to wait and later separated as cs and non-cs
and jus imagine we done IT and categorized as non-cs:(
bad isn't it

neway we goto to a room n sit n sit n sit n sit
later our docs r collected
cds r shown
later we r left for lunch which was complimentary
after that we come back n get our accounts opened in a bank(kotak mahindra)
after that we r taken to the library where we get some good shock we r given 12 books as fat as
complete reference java
and told we will be taught all this

taking all the books we goto a hall where we need our finger prints to be taken
we go there n sit but nothing happs we r called on a sat for that work

so we leave at 630 on day one when we r supposed to be left at 530 and
called on a sat when we have a sat Sunday off and to top it all the 12 books

so the next day we come on sat we r given some more shocks as our loc will be gigaspace
thts an hour from the place we were
so all our parents start searching for a home in gigaspace (at viman nagar)
and all get homes there (I stay with my mausi in camp )

later on Monday our first day we goto gigaspace a wonderful place so huge and good construction
we have pt (programming techniques ) lec
and we begin we meet akbar shaik
I still remm the way meenu used to say shaik (by shaking herself )

Later one more shock
we will be shifted to manikchand in next 10 to 15 days
later days went by going to office n coming back with training sessions

we got to meet new friends
got to know each other and dam after 10 days we were shifted to manikchand
so we travel for almost an hour or more everyday to manikchand
manikchand was also good........we started enjoying each day

the "MuZje" of our mentor and the confused harshal
we enjoyed all days
also the tests the results ...........ours going to Mumbai together .........playing antakshari
practicing together.............

we all were together
later when all of us got our pl/sql result though more than half the class failed we all were together
and this brought us all close

and we started to come on sat as well as sun
and enjoying each day
none of us would go home before 6
all would sit n talk n do tp

later retest was given and all cleared quite well
then our behavioural training started
the most wonderful time
with all the activities and the way shohrat(our trainer) organized it for us
all of us had fun
the screaming we did .............the punishments ................the activates..........the lunch we had
oh all seems so recent

and never knew how the 17 days of fun was over
we all had a mixture of feelings when he left
we jus didn't want it to end
though some day it had to................

then the next day we all got our locs another day which we all dreaded
all of us got separated and the days after those went so horrible what do I say
but still we all r in each others contact and also I remm the dinner we had on the 18th
it was fun all together

so all of us will always keep in touch and the fond memories will always be there
u all too can add ne
do tc and keep smiling and enjoy the projects in which u all are
I too will enjoy when I get one
(hehehe)
MISS U ALL >:D<